EIGRP Basics (Passive Interfaces)

When EIGRP is up and operational, unicast and multicast EIGRP packets or constantly flooding the network to make sure EIGRP routes are up and are using the best path. These packets are important but not always necessary. There are situations when disabling an interfaces ability to spam the network with EIGRP packets is appropriate and will still allow for a fully operational EIGRP convergence. The way to achieve this is by configuring an interface to passive mode. EIGRP will still advertise the network/subnet configured on that interface, however, the interface will not participate in sending or processing of EIGPR packets.

Here is an example:

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RIPv2 (Routing Information Protocol) – Basics Part 1

In order to have packets flowing through the modern network you need Physical Equipment (Layer 1), you need aggregated devices such as switches for quick transport (layer 2), and finally you need routers/layer 3 switches that can route traffic on an ip network (layer 3). Each hop or interface along a path needs to have a layer 3 ip address IPv4 or IPv6 in order for the packet to traverse the ip network. The way that all layer 3 devices make decisions to forward traffic is a routing table. The three ways a layer 3 devices learns and adds routes to its routing table are:

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